in

8 Convenience Store Alcoholic Drinks You Must Try!

Suntory Hi-Ball

Japanese convenience store

The classic high ball is the standard cocktail for dinner parties with colleagues. The Japanese highball is a refreshing mix of crisp soda mixed with Japanese whiskey. 

Bring a few of these to your next Sakura viewing in spring, and you’ll be a winner with the corporate office workers. 

Happoshu 

Convenience Store Alcohol

This sparkling low-malt beer is a beer product Japanese drink companies use to avoid paying Japanese beer taxes. 

By law, a beer with a malt percentage a % gets placed into a different alcohol tax bracket and charged a higher tax. Thus we have these unique beer offshoots with around 25% malt mixed with rice, corn, and starch.

Often the result is a cheaper beer that tastes like sewer water and leaves a nasty headache. Regardless, some are worth trying for the novelty.

Try these:

  • Asahi Clear
  • Kirin Green Label
  • Hokkaido Nama-shibori Migaki-mugi
  • Nodogoshi-nama – No Malt, instead uses Soy Protein

Sake: One Cup Ozeki

Japanese convenience store

Ahh yes, the classic old man sake cup. 

This innovative and convenient one serving cup of rice wine is the first of its kind. It originally debuted in 1964 during the first Olympics in Tokyo and continues to stay popular with older generations.

Grab a rice ball, and pop a top off of one of these, and head to the local park to get the full experience from this classic drink.

Umeshu

Umeshu, or plum wine, is the boozy office lady’s drink of choice. 

This sugary mix of plum and alcohol leaves a sweet and sour taste on the palate. Umeshu is best when accompanied with ice or soda water. 


After all this drinking, you are going to need some hangover cures. Head over to our list of Japanese Hangover cures that promise to cure that pounding in your head!

Do you have a go-to alcoholic beverage at the local convenience store? Let us know in the comments!

5 Comments

Leave a Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Loading…

How to celebrate New Year’s Eve in Tokyo

Celebrate the Countdown at ageHa with Robot Restaurant and Sigala!